Positive Behaviour Support in Hampshire

Case study summary

PBS4 is a small a non-profit social care provider based in Hampshire that is underpinned by Positive Behaviour Support (PBS) by design. They currently support seven people with behaviours that, without the right support, would be at risk of hospital admission.

 

Supporting people with a learning disability to live in their own tenancies

  • PBS4 is a small non-profit social care provider based in Hampshire. They support seven people with behaviours that, without the right support, would be at risk of hospital admission.
  • Each person has a team recruited specifically for them, so they are supported by people that understand their exact needs.
  • Each team is named after the person they are supporting, for example PBS4David. This reminds everyone it’s all about what David needs.
  • PBS4 use tools that support person-centred thinking to design each support package.

PBS4 is a small a non-profit social care provider based in Hampshire that is underpinned by Positive Behaviour Support (PBS) by design. They currently support seven people with behaviours that, without the right support, would be at risk of hospital admission.

This is helping to deliver the national Transforming Care programme which is improving services for people with a learning disability and/or autism with behaviour that challenges.

“We understand that people with learning disabilities have very few ways of meeting their needs, and it is wrong for us to remove their ways of meeting needs just because we find their ways ‘challenging’,” says Chief Enablement Officer Jonathan Beebee. “So we understand what the behaviours are for and promote people having better ways to meet their needs, to make the ‘challenging behaviour’ redundant.”

Each person has a team recruited specifically for them, so they are supported by people that understand their exact needs. The organisation’s own name reinforces the importance of the person at the centre of their care, so that David’s personal support team is called PBS4David. “We use this to encourage our teams to be person centred in their thinking,” says Jonathan.

The organisation’s directors are a learning disability nurse and a psychology graduate, both trained to masters-level in positive behaviour support. The organisation also employs two board-certified behaviour analysts.

Jonathan puts their success down to being a small, local provider. “We have qualified practitioners as part of our service,” he says, “and each team is designed bespoke to the person we are supporting.”

Engaging with people and their families

PBS4 have done a number of things to engage with people and their families. They have set up a voluntary board which includes a man with autism and the parent of a young man with learning disabilities who is described as challenging. They use person centred thinking tools to design the support they provide and involve people and their families as much or as little as they want in the support they provide. This can include jointly interviewing team members and being part of their team meetings.

“One parent was finding the transition to adulthood for their child difficult so we have helped them to start coffee mornings locally,” says Jonathan. “This has allowed her to meet and talk with parents in similar situations.”

Structured support helps David to live in his own home

David (not his real name) is 19 years old and has been in secure residential schooling for the past 10 years. He has autism and severe learning disabilities, and has behaviours that can often challenge his support. Months before he was due to leave school he severely bit his support worker. There were blue light care and treatment reviews and chemical restraint was being considered along with admission to a secure hospital.

Non-profit care provider PBS4 assessed David and identified that his behaviours that were challenging were usually when he wanted to avoid demands, especially when the demands were a surprise to him. They worked with a housing association who were able to find a detached house for David that was affordable through his housing benefit. They worked with the school to understand the furniture he would need and the layout of the house. They also worked with David’s parents to set goals for David and understand what was important to him, and important for him.

David has now been living in his own tenancy with his own support team for four months and his care has been transformed. He has a stable team who know him well and provide him with structured and predictable support, so there are fewer surprises. This is supported by developing picture schedules and promoting David’s ability to communicate with others by exchanging picture symbols. There are still times when David is agitated, as there are for any of us, but generally he is relaxed and happy. They are now liaising with local colleges and work experience placements to plan him daytime occupation that he can regularly attend.

Contact

Jonathan Beebee, Chief Enablement Officer, jonathan.beebee@pbs4.org.uk