System interventions to aid recognition and response

There are many systems which have been introduced to help clinicians recognise and respond to the deterioration of children. Fundamentally as clinicians we want to recognise and intervene when the children in our care become worse. Children do not follow rules of deterioration and their signs can be subtle and difficult to spot. Here are some resources, videos and information which have been put together to help you and your teams with this difficult task.

Re-ACT talks

Spotting Sepsis in the Sick Child – By Jeremy Tong, Consultant Paediatric Intensivist, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Scores or Systems: What is a PEWS? – By Damian Roland, Consultant and Honorary Senior Lecturer in Paediatric Emergency Medicine, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust and Leicester University.

A patient safety alert has been issued by NHS England to continue to raise awareness of sepsis and to signpost clinicians in the ambulance service, primary and community services and secondary care to a set of resources developed by the UK Sepsis Trust, and others. These resources support the prompt recognition and initiation of treatments for all patients suspected of having sepsis.

You can access the resources on the UK Sepsis Trust website.

Severe sepsis is a clinical emergency. Signs and symptoms of sepsis in children can be subtle and deterioration to shock rapid.

Effective use of standardised communication processes

SBAR (Situation, Background, Assessment, Recommendation) is an easy to remember mechanism that can be used to frame conversations, especially critical ones requiring a clinician’s immediate attention and action. It can aid clarity when making an emergency call or when requesting advice or intervention about patient management from a senior clinician or General Practitioner. SBAR can also be used effectively to enhance handovers between shifts or between staff in the same or different clinical areas and can also be used effectively to enhance handovers between shifts or between staff in the same or different clinical areas.