7 Day Services

7 Day Services – Urgent Specialist Network Services

The NHS Operational Planning and Contracting Guidance for 2017-19 outlines that by November 2017, the five urgent network specialist services (acute stroke, STEMI heart attacks, major trauma, emergency vascular and paediatric intensive care) should meet the four priority standards for seven-day hospital services.

A detailed assessment of compliance against the four priority standards for seven day services will be undertaken during February 2017 to help direct further action. As part of this exercise, providers are being asked to undertake a short case note review across a seven day period.

7 Day Urgent Specialist Network Services – Clinical Guidance

Detailed clinical guidance about how the four priority standards for seven day services might be implemented within the five urgent network specialist services (acute stroke, STEMI heart attacks, major trauma, emergency vascular and paediatric intensive care):

7 Day Services – Urgent Specialist Network Services – Baseline Position at November 2016

This baseline aims to provide a national and regional view of the five urgent network specialist services against the four priority standards for seven day services at November 2016. Through assessing the current position, gaps in both performance and knowledge will be identified, enabling regional UEC teams to build robust programmes to ensure delivery.

7 Day Services – Acute Trusts

Implementing the four priority standards seven-day services is a ‘must do’ for all hospitals by 2020. Progress will be monitored every six months by NHS Improvement and NHS England to ensure hospitals are adhering to these standards in all relevant specialties.

Research report February 2017 The London Quality Standards (LQS ) – Lessons Learned

The Nuffield Trust report outlines the findings of a year-long research project that explored the strengths and weaknesses of the LQS programme and its impact. This work provides critical learning for future similar initiatives, particularly the Seven Day Services Clinical Standards being introduced across England.

Developed and launched in 2011, the LQS are professional consensus standards designed to address the unacceptable variations found in the provision of unscheduled care. They mandate timely clinical review by junior, consultant and multidisciplinary (MDT) staff; timely access to key diagnostic, interventional and other allied clinical services; robust monitoring of patients with appropriate responses to clinical deterioration; and patterns of extended working seven days per .