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NHS waiting times published today

Dr Barbara Hakin, Chief Operating Officer, NHS England, said:

“The NHS does face a challenge on the 18-week standard but staff are working incredibly hard to ensure patients are seen quickly.

“The figures published today show that in February we failed to meet the standard on the number of patients who were admitted for their treatment within 18 weeks from referral by their GP.

“During February, around 270,000 patients were admitted for treatment within the standard, and around 400 waited longer than we would have liked. This shows we are treating more patients than ever, but we do need to treat patients in order of clinical priority.  This means treating those who have waited the longest, which may mean that we miss the standard.

“We are doing more operations and treating more people than ever – over a million people start treatment with a consultant each month.  The overwhelming majority of patients still get treatment within the 18 week standard and around fifty per cent of patients are admitted for treatment within ten weeks of their GP referring them to hospital.

“The NHS is performing well across a broad range of indicators, including urgent care where we have delivered to the 95 percent standard as laid down by the NHS Constitution.

“We are determined to redouble our efforts so that we do meet the standard and 90 per cent of patients are treated within 18 weeks. But this may take several months as it is imperative we focus on those who have waited longest.”

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3 comments

  1. George Donald says:

    It is the right approach to treat long waiters and breach the admitted target if necessary,

    However, I do not understand where the figure of 400 comes from: in February for admitted pathways, 269318 patients were treated within 18 weeks, but 30417 had waited over 18 weeks.

    Please explain.

  2. Chris Reid says:

    How can you possibly reach any target when staff reductions are so high. In Blackburn Lancashire our hospitals are in special measures, they claim to have recruited enough staff to reach the levels required, yet they still have to shed 500 jobs.to help reduce the budget by £80 Million. Impossible.The so called facts do not add up. we can not recruit and retain top clinicians like we had a few years ago. we have second best in a lot of areas. The good staff who could emigrate have done so. Staff that are left are working hard to cover the cracks. However the management need to stand up to the political masters and tell them enough is enough. I don’t know how we can send patients to private hospitals costing a fortune and leave the NHS short of funds. The NHS is being ripped off by every contractor that deals with them, thanks to poor procurement knowledge, they can use their buying power locally and nationally to get much better prices. I believe they are interviewing all the staff individually as to why they would not recommend their friends or relative be treated in an East Lancs Hospital. This was the result of a staff survey. Sadly the competence of staff at all levels is being called into question, For the record I would not be treated as an in patient in this hospital if at all possible, I would cross borders if needs be. That is a sad state of affairs for an NHS I have supported and still do, all my life. we all know the answer is money and the current unelected coalition are hell bent on destroying the NHS, But some of us will try to stop them.

  3. Donald Smith says:

    The text written on behalf of Barbara Hakin , reads

    ” we do need to treat patients in order of clinical priority. This means treating those who have waited the longest, which may mean that we miss the standard”

    .Perhaps someone should read their letter before publishing it as this sentence is NONSENSE. The text should have read:
    “” we do need to treat patients in order of clinical priority. This may mean NOT treating those who have waited the longest, which may mean that we miss the standard”