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New Care Models and Staff Engagement: All Aboard

NHS Confederation, NHS Clinical Commissioners, NHS Providers and the Local Government Association, have today (15 June) published a handy guide to the work vanguards are doing to engage their staff in the design and delivery of new care models. The new report – New Care Models and Staff Engagement: All Aboard aims to help spread the learning from the vanguard programme across the health and care sector.

The publication contains four case studies which examine the ongoing work of NHS and local government organisations that are ensuring staff are at the heart of all decisions about new models of care in local areas.

They are:

  • All Together Better Dudley (multispecialty community provider)
  • Barking and Dagenham, Havering and Redbridge System Resilience Group (urgent and emergency care)
  • Better Care Together – Morecambe Bay Health Community (integrated primary and acute care system)
  • East and North Hertfordshire Clinical Commissioning Group (enhanced health in care homes)The publication also identifies a number of key principles in order to help plan staff engagement when developing new models of care.

They include:

  • Enabling different groups of staff across organisations to ‘break down the barriers’ so people can break out of old working patterns and think differently.
  • Recognising that those on the front line of care have the best ideas about how to improve it – but need to feel empowered to do so.
  • Recognising that if staff feel that their contribution is valued, they will want to do all they can to make new care models a success.

This publication is the second in a series of two. The first publication, focused on new models of care and prevention and was published at the end of May.

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7 comments

  1. Listening into Action (LiA) has been adopted in 80+ Trusts in the past four years alone. It links the engagement effort to priority patient outcomes and delivers measurable results within the first year. This case study from Barts provides a real example http://bit.ly/BartsLiACaseStudy New ‘best ever’ cohort starts in 2017. Happy to talk to anyone interested in the approach and the learning.

  2. Pearl Baker says:

    The report I have just read from the Professionals Standards Authority should be read very carefully, evidence on my files suggest that a number of Professionals from Health and Social Care Agencies are letting the ‘side’ down.

    There is insufficient monitoring of both agencies, and serious errors in ‘judgement’ is taking place.

    It is taking Carer and Independent Advocates to take on these challenges, but lessons must be learnt.

  3. Anonymous says:

    The thing is, whenever home care agency carers used to help me, I felt even more stressed, because I was going through something quite upsetting, in my personal life, in my relationship with my boyfriend, so how on earth the homecare manager thought she could help me with that is a bit pointless. They have to understand they can’t see to all of our life problems. Especially the more private stuff we deal with in relationships. Because home care is only task-based, I felt they weren’t the right kind of people to tell. I was just getting worse, every time, so I cancelled the agency. You can’t always be bothered with letting carers in, when you’re having a rubbish time. It has an impact on the rest of your day. It would feel far less of a hassle to be in a residential care home, because then carers are always around, so you get used to them a lot more. Home care feels intimidating.

  4. Anonymous says:

    What about people who want to live in care homes? It’s all very well introducing this or that for communities, but not all of us want to stay in our own home. Sometimes care homes are better for our mental illness and mental wellbeing. I’m talking about quality of care. Home care didn’t work for me. It felt weird letting people I didn’t know into my home. That’s not normally the way most people work. We’re taught by our parents not to let strangers into our homes. But rightly so. It was also too much, when my CPN turned up, with mental health students to my home without telling me. Moving house is stressful enough, without having unexpected visitors. Day centres don’t provide the care that I need. I don’t even understand the purpose of them.

  5. It is extremely important to provide a 3rd publication. I would argue the most important. New Models of Care – Patient Engagement: Equal Partners

  6. Michael Vidal says:

    What work is being done to engage patients and the public in the design of these services. Bearing in mind the statutory duties in relation to PPI the absence in most cases of any meaningful engagement of patients and the public is an issue. While the timescales imposed on CCG’s are not helpful in this regard as NHS City and Hackney CCG have shown engagement is possible.

  7. Kassander says:

    New Care Models and, Patient and Public Engagement: All Aboard -Including the Fare Payers

    The Patient and Public Engagement Board [P&PEB] has today ( 12th of Never)
    published a handy guide to the work they are engaging their vanguards in, concerning the design and delivery of new care models for them and all other Patients and Public in England.

    The new report –
    New Care Models and, Patient and Public Engagement: All Aboard -Including the Fare Payers
    aims to help spread the learning from the vanguard programme across the health and care sector.

    The publication contains case studies which examine the ongoing work of NHS, local government, and Patient and Public [P&P] organisations that are ensuring P&P, as well as staff, are at the heart of all decisions about new models of care in local areas.

    They include:

    Enabling different groups of staff​ in consultation with P&P​ across organisations to ‘break down the barriers’ so people can break out of old engagement patterns and behave differently.
    Recognising that those on the front line of care, the recipients, often have the best ideas about how to improve it – but need to feel empowered to do so.
    Recognising that ​when P&P ​know that their contribution is valued, they will ​be enabled to do all they can to make new care models a success.
    This publication is the ​third​ in ​the ​series​.​